ZORA ARKUS-DUNTOV: GODFATHER OF THE CORVETTE

ZORA ARKUS-DUNTOV: GODFATHER OF THE CORVETTE
Our friends at MID AMERICA MOTORWORKS pay tribute to ZORA ARKUS-DUNTOV: GODFATHER OF THE CORVETTE, the man responsible for America’s first real sports car. Zora Arkus-Duntov was a brilliant engineer who transformed the Corvette from a stylish sports car into a legendary high-performance machine. Arkus-Duntov was born in 1909 and raised in Saint Petersburg, Russia. After the Russian Revolution, the family immigrated to Berlin, Germany where he earned an engineering degree from Charlottenburg Tec...
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CHASSIS HISTORY PART 1: 1953-1962 CORVETTE!

CHASSIS HISTORY PART 1: 1953-1962 CORVETTE!
Corvette historian and illustrator Scott Teeters starts off his Corvette history series with the chassis that Maurice Olley & Mauri Rose built. And, the start of Zora Arkus-Duntov’s involvement. The late legendary SCCA Corvette racing champion, Frank Dominanni, left, with Jan Hyde, with his original '60 Corvette Fuelie that he's owned since new. Hyde runs the Registry Of Corvette Race Cars. Corvettes are kind of like a beautiful woman. Sure, she’s a beauty, but is she smart and athletic? Fr...
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ZORA DUNTOV & MID-ENGINE CORVETTE MYSTIQUE!

ZORA DUNTOV & MID-ENGINE CORVETTE MYSTIQUE!
Ken Kayser’s latest tome - Corvette Legend Or Myth & Zora’s Marque of Excellence, Volume II, Zora’s Fabulous Mid-Ship Corvette History - is actually a 750-page, portable Corvette research library. If you consider yourself a Corvette aficionado and/or a student of American automotive history, your bookshelf should have Corvette-centric published works penned by Kenneth W. Kayser. A retired GM engineer, Kayser spent years at the Tonawanda Engine Plant (think big-blocks, L88, ZL1, etc) and la...
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PONTIAC FLASHBACK: TEMPEST MONTE CARLO!

PONTIAC FLASHBACK: TEMPEST MONTE CARLO!
Built on a shortened ’62 Pontiac Tempest convertible, the Monte Carlo was a hit at auto shows and major road racing events. It shared the spotlight with GM design chief, William Mitchell’s Corvair Sebring Spyder show car. One thing was a given at GM in the 1960s: Chevy’s Corvette was a sacred cow and no other division could bring a two-seat sports car to market. The only way Buick, Pontiac, Oldsmobile or Cadillac could reveal branded two-seat, high-performance sporty vehicles was to have Mitche...
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